‘WandaVision’: Can Marvel’s TV series keep up to the expectations of their movies

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Madelyn Kidd, Editor-in-Chief

After “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Avengers: Endgame,” many fans of Wanda and Vision’s relationship thought they would never get to see the two together again. However, shortly after “Avengers: Endgame,” it was announced that there would be a new Marvel TV series “WandaVision.” Many speculated on how this would happen with Vision being killed in “Avengers: Infinity War,” but the trailer explained this by revealing that Wanda and Vision are stuck inside some sort of realm or fictional world. 

However, a greater concern of fans is if the TV series could match up to the expectations of Marvel’s movies. After the two episode première on Jan. 15, it was revealed that each episode was themed around a decade starting in the 50s, and each episode is its own episode of the TV show WandaVision within the series “WandaVision.” It’s kinda confusing to put into words. Basically, within Marvel’s “WandaVision,” Wanda and Vision are living and stuck within a TV show also called WandaVision themed around what was popular during the decade of the episode. The storyline of the TV show within the TV show is she has powers, and he’s actually a computer instead of a human being and together they must make sure no one finds out the truth.

The first episode followed a 50s TV show theme in fashion, clothing, comedic skits, music and a live audience along with being filmed in black and white. Throughout the episode, there is confusion from Wanda and Vision of why the day’s date is marked. It seems as if it’s following a comedic skit of the show’s plot from the time period. However, confusion for both Wanda and Vision continues throughout the show with problems about them not knowing information they should know. Like why they just moved into the neighborhood or when did they get married and if they’re married why don’t they have wedding rings. 

The first two episodes mostly follow Wanda being shown she’s starting to break through the facade of being in the TV show, but when that happens things magically get fixed or forgotten of whatever it was that made her start to break through the facade. At the end of the episode after problems were fixed by unknown sources or were fixed with Wanda’s powers, we see the TV show on a television and someone with a remote seeming to be in control. This shows that even though Wanda uses her powers to fix some of the breaks in the facade, there seems to still be someone else pulling the strings.

In the second episode, we are suddenly in the 60s decade without really an explanation why. The TV show’s, that Wanda and Vision are stuck in, plot for the episode is that there is the town’s talent show where Wanda and Vision need to participate to help show they are “normal” human beings. However, an interesting break in the facade happens for Wanda when she starts to see certain things in color despite being stuck in a black and white 60s TV show. An interesting point that might mean something later on, is that when Wanda first starts to see color, she sees things that are just red or mostly red, which might be because it’s part of both Wanda’s and Vision’s Avenger uniforms. By the end of the episode, it’s shown that the TV show is suddenly in color because they’re now in the 70s with new color television. Therefore, making Wanda’s break in the facade excused, so she doesn’t have to think too much about it anymore.

However, that’s not the only break in the facade that Wanda experiences. She also hears a man’s voice over the radio trying to contact her. Saying things like, “Wanda? Who is doing this to you, Wanda? Wanda?” Wanda then breaks the radio with her powers as she panics from possibly realizing this isn’t reality. 

At first I thought the voice was familiar, but I couldn’t figure out who it was until I looked it up online. The voice is actually coming from F.B.I. Agent Jimmy Woo. If you don’t know or can’t remember who Agent Jimmy Woo is, he was the agent assigned to keep watch over Scott Lang in “Ant-Man and the Wasp” after Scott returned home after “Captain America: Civil War.” This shows that at least the people outside of this facade think there is a third-party involved in Wanda’s TV imprisonment, and that it’s not her own doing.

At the end of the episode, Wanda magically becomes pregnant with a baby bump immediately. The pregnancy is giving a nod to Wanda and Vision’s twins from the 80s comics. However, it’s what happens after finding out she is pregnant before it doesn’t happen anymore that’s weird. After finding out she’s pregnant Wanda and Vision hear a noise outside and go out to investigate it. Only to find someone in a bee keeper suit surrounded by bees escaped out of the street sewer. At first Wanda is frightened by this unknown figure until her face goes neutral. Then it’s as if someone presses a rewind button because we watch the whole scene rewind until we reach Wanda and Vision first finding out she’s pregnant. However, this time as the scene plays out, there’s no loud noise that draws them outside, and therefore no stranger in a beekeeper suit and his ward of bees.

With that ending then taken back ending, it’s really strange, and much like Wanda and Vision, I don’t know what’s going on. Overall, I think this plot of the series is really interesting and in a world of streaming services giving you the whole season at once, I’ve been spoiled and want the whole season now. 

However, based on the two episode premèire is the TV series as good as the movies. Not exactly, for Marvel action packed movie lovers, you’re going to think this series is dull and the worst show ever. However, for fans that have enjoyed other Marvel TV series like “Agents of SHIELD,” “Agent Carter” or “Daredevil,” you’ll most likely enjoy this one too. Especially since Wanda and Vision are more popular due to the movies, this TV series has really good special effects. Not as amazing and high quality as the movies, but in comparison to the standard special effects for TV shows they’re impressive.

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